Skip to Main content Skip to Navigation

From “the Doors of the Seas” to a Watery Debacle: The Sea, Scottish Colonization, and the Darien Scheme, 1696–1700

Abstract : The Darien Scheme (1696-1700) appears as Scotland’s greatest attempt at colonial expansion in its own right, before the 1707 Union of Parliaments. Due to its peninsular situation and overall poverty, the nation had a long tradition of emigration, and by the end of the 17th century, it also wished to take part in the trans-Atlantic venture. Far from being perceived as an obstacle, the sea had a crucial part to play, both as a means of reaching the Americas and as a way of furthering overseas trade. But enemies too could come from the sea, and for many of the survivors of Spanish retaliation and tropical fevers, the Caribbean and the Atlantic were not only a way of escape, but also a watery grave, in an ambivalent reversal of what had first appeared as a dazzling opportunity.
Document type :
Journal articles
Complete list of metadatas

Cited literature [35 references]  Display  Hide  Download

https://hal.uca.fr/hal-02362080
Contributor : Sophie Jorrand <>
Submitted on : Wednesday, November 13, 2019 - 5:01:57 PM
Last modification on : Monday, February 10, 2020 - 12:17:30 PM

File

etudesecossaises-1184.pdf
Files produced by the author(s)

Identifiers

  • HAL Id : hal-02362080, version 1

Citation

Sophie Jorrand. From “the Doors of the Seas” to a Watery Debacle: The Sea, Scottish Colonization, and the Darien Scheme, 1696–1700. Etudes écossaises, ELLUG, 2017, Scotland and the Sea. ⟨hal-02362080⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

23

Files downloads

13